Three words

Three words…Borderline Personality Disorder.

I don’t even know how to feel right now.

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5 Responses to Three words

  1. Lisa C says:

    Remember knowledge is power; and knowing and working on treatment is much better than not knowing and not understanding what triggers her actions and her reactions. I am sending you hugs and you remain in my thoughts and prayers.

  2. kris says:

    Carolyn,
    I urge you to read Robert O. Friedel’s book, Borderline Personality Disorder Demystified. Understanding how and why your daughter is behaving the way she is will help you. I also highly recommend that you read Robert Whitaker’s book Anatomy of an Epidemic so that you can best navigate the next few steps in your daughter’s healing.
    DO NOT listen to the doctors who sound like this is a life sentence. And, if you can, limit the drugs they will be prescribing. Only in the US do people with BPD receive a cocktail of prescription meds. Personality disorders are generally not considered treatable by drugs. They will want to convince your daughter to take antidepressants but the side effects among people with BPD traits are terrible – mania and psychosis. Then, she will display these symptoms and the real “drug therapy” gets rolling. Antipsychotics and mood stabilizers are added. The side effects are horrendous. More drugs are added. Your daughter, like mine, has addiction tendencies – this only exacerbates the problems.
    You daughter CAN heal. Through alternative methods like therapy, emdr, diet, etc., she will have a real chance. My daughter has been off of the drug regime for a little over a year. She is so much better. Still has a ways to go, but worlds apart from when she was drugged.
    It is a hard system to fight. Drugs are the quick and easy fix. They will stabilize her on drugs and get her zoned out and send her home. Please read the review of Whitaker’s book that I am pasting here. It will give you some leverage to help make some immediate decisions.
    http://harrymagnet.blogspot.com/
    I will be available to answer any questions. I wish I had had someone to ask for help when my daughter was fist diagnosed. So, please use me as a reference.
    xx kris

    • peglud says:

      Carolyn – go to this website to find out more about BPD and the work Dr. Marsha Lenihan is doing at the University of Washington. She’s the one who developed Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) There are some other good links at this site. Once again, it sounds as if Kris knows a lot about BPD and seems to have a very healthy, holistic approach to treatment. She’s a valuable resource.

  3. Dawn McCoy says:

    well. wow. i read this yesterday and didn’t comment for a bit.

    thoughts.

    many of our addicts are cross/mis diagnosed.

    many of our children are cross/mis diagnosed. case in point. Pint. ADHD. that one I believe. then they added BiPolar. that one I didn’t believe, and turns out I was spot on !

    perhaps a second opinion is in order?

    I think the medical community at large looks to find something ELSE to blame the addiction on, and sometimes there is a dual diagnosis, and sometimes there isn’t, but one is labled just for the sake of easier? does that make sense.

    go to the borderline personality association webpage. find the little form thingy that you fill out to see if your answers indicate BPD. answer them all from when she was a teen/child. does she fit? if so, then they could be right. if not, then they could be wrong.

    this is just a really sticky wicket. although I am not totally on board with the above commentor, she does make a valid opine that the tendency is to drug, drug, drug…

    best of luck, and prayers coming your way. keep in touch through the blog. we all worry about you ya know.

  4. Barbara says:

    When and how was she diagnosed? Please, please don’t jump to conclusions about this. Seek more than one opinion and please please read the blog Kris writes about her daughter. If I could turn back the clock I would have done things differently when my son got a diagnosis (which kept changing). I would have tried to figure it out how to help him before they medicated him to the point of being a zombie. Eventually the meds stopped working but he’s afraid to not take them. I guess what I am saying is similar to what Dawn, Lisa and Kris said above.

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